Ak57\’s Weblog

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Making sense of crossovers, Part 5: Parting thoughts


As hard to believe as this sounds, I am both for and against the crossover efforts. In fact the only thing that would make me happy would be mass by-elections or fresh general elections. On September 11th, PKR Vice President Sivarasa Rasiah stated that the Opposition would hold general elections 6-12 months after seizing control of the government, so there is hope that the voters will get a say in who runs their government.

The main reasons the Opposition made any headway at all in the five states was the dissemination of information. The mainstream media has its mouth gagged on many issues, so the Internet and sms was used to great effect to spread the word.

However for states such as Terengganu, Sabah, Sarawak and Pahang where the Internet user base and income level is much lower, spreading information is difficult. It takes time to change people’s minds in these states. By-elections would not result in a big swing towards the Opposition.

The only feasible way for the Opposition to take control of the government is via crossovers. I strongly hope that laws are amended so that the Federal government does not have the kind of control it has now over the State governments. Until those amendments are made our democracy will never mature into a two-party system. A mixed cabinet of BN and Opposition MPs would help too.

The BN government has made full use of their Federal control to make life difficult for the Opposition state governments. Let us hope that the Opposition does not do the same once it takes over.

Since I completed this article we have witnessed the use of the Internal Security Act on Raja Petra, Teresa Kok and Tan Hoon Cheng. This scare tactic which appears to be initiated independently by the police begs the question of who is pulling their strings. It is legal for them to use ISA to detain people for questioning, but there are many other laws they could use instead of ISA. Someone must have encouraged them to do so.

The ISA is so strongly linked in the minds of the people as ‘government intimidation’ that I seriously doubt the PM or his Cabinet members were responsible in the case of Teresa Kok and Tan Hoon Cheng. Those arrests made no sense whatsoever. Raja Petra is a special case because people within BN and PKR view him as too outspoken. While what he has said about Islam makes sense to people like me, it upsets many more. I am curious how much attention Raja Petra’s detention will receive in the form of candlelight vigils, forums and so on now that the other two have been released.

Anwar Ibrahim did not meet his September 16th deadline, citing unrest caused by the ISA. He has tried to arrange a private meeting with the Prime Minister to discuss a handover of government, which the PM rightfully denied. I saw a copy of the letter sent – it was vaguely written and mentioned no list of crossovers. The PM must show strength and not give in to unsubstantiated facts (factoid).

On September 17th SAPP pulled out of BN, yet chose to remain independent. It appears they too wish to see if Anwar has the numbers.

Anwar then asked for an emergency session of Parliament for September 23rd, which I assume won’t happen either. He even stated he would see the Agong to seek intervention.

I am patient enough to wait a few weeks until October 13th when Parliament reconvenes. In my view Anwar fixed a deadline and didn’t finish his preparation work. Private meetings with the PM would be part of this work.

BN MPs finding it difficult to reach the Peninsular is not relevant, because they can submit their resignations in writing. Their lives and their families’ lives were always at risk, the usage of the ISA did not change that. Has some form of protection been given to them, or will they be left to fend for themselves like the private investigator Bala after giving his statutory declaration on Najib?

Anwar said he would take over the government on the 16th and he failed, plain and simple. When meeting the Agong was mentioned I knew that it was an act of desperation to save face. I do not doubt that he will take over the government eventually – I just wish he would be more patient.

To date, there is still no evidence of the 31 BN MPs ready to join the Opposition.


Making sense of crossovers

This series of articles tries to analyse the unending efforts of the Federal Opposition to take over the government by getting BN MPs to join them. Their goal is to get at least 31 BN MPs to change their allegiance on September 16th.

Part 1 looks at how PKR grew and the state it is in now, as they are the prime mover of the crossover ‘operation’.

Part 2 discusses the many justifications heard to support the crossovers.

Part 3 discusses the moral and democratic issues and suggested alternatives.

Part 4 describes ways to prevent and encourage crossovers.

Part 5 offers some parting thoughts and views on recent events

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Written by ak57

September 24, 2008 at 7:00 am

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