Ak57\’s Weblog

Thoughts and opinions on Malaysian news, its people and its culture

Posts Tagged ‘Anwar Ibrahim

Thoughts on Hulu Selangor By-election, Part 1

As I write this, BN is leading the voting count. Of course once counting is complete I fully expect the losing side to demand a recount (assuming the rules allow it). This by-election had the most effort put in by both sides so far, more than any by-election to date. (Note: I am aware I left out mention of political issues e.g. no corruption, but I have my reasons to focus solely on PKR).

Why PKR needs to win

  • Zaid Ibrahim needs a win to legitimise the important role (post?) he was given when he joined PKR. Remember when he had to cancel a trip to Sabah/Sarawak because some leaders disapproved?
  • Tan Sri Khalid needs a win because his leadership style has made a lot of enemies among party grassroots.
  • Anwar Ibrahim needs a win because the party hoppers that were his close friends hurt his clout among the grassroots. It surprises me when I hear long-time members make disparaging remarks about him. Since late last year there was serious talk that Zaid should replace him in the near future. Such talk only increases the internal squabbles.
  • PKR needs to show that they can run a by-election with the grassroots and leadership that they have. It will affect member morale nationwide.

So if PKR loses, I expect the usual complaints about phantom voters or even so far as declaring the by-election invalid due to the 14,000 voters that had their voting stations moved.

What works in PKR’s favour

  • Use of state govt machinery to get votes. The MB moved his office to Hulu Selangor and for the first time in history, held the weekly State Exco meetings there instead of Shah Alam.

What works against PKR

  • Lack of cooperation between PKR and PAS. Whether this is due to PAS disapproval of Zaid, or just lack of organisational skills of PKR is anyone’s guess. However PAS did state publicly that it was due to difficulty in coordinating with PKR.
  • Lack of strong PKR grassroots. By strong I mean given a task, they will really do it and not just come back later and say they did.

What works in BN’s favour

  • Crazy sums of money to give out. I don’t agree with bribes but I have to say that if their concerts had attendees (PKR had concerts too), and gifts accepted then the blame lies with the electorate. If bribery was the right way to get their vote, sadly that show BN understands them better.
  • Larger grassroots base. Functional or not I wouldn’t know.

I actually hope BN wins, for several reasons:

PKR members (not just elected reps) have gotten too arrogant. They have forgotten that they were handed power in 2008 and need to earn it in the next GE. They should have invested time in defining party culture and developing leadership at every level, not just blindly recruiting and ordering members to volunteer. Our message is good but our grassroots management strategy is weak.

PKR needs to learn that different communities require different tactics to win their vote. For some people all they understand is how to vote based on race or which side gives more money. The only way to change that mentality is by education and 2-3 weeks of ceramah is not enough. This is where strong grassroots come in, if not ceramah then by leafleting. It’s an epic task but it needs to be done.

All 3 ADUNs under the MP seat are BN. Even though they have been crippled by having their state allocations withheld by the Selangor State govt (and given to Exco members Ean Yong and Elizabeth under ADUN Angkat programme), they still matter. The previous PKR MP could not have achieved much because he did not have a strong grassroots or ADUNs to help manage the constituency. The Exco members are too busy to be there for him as regularly as ADUNs. So if Zaid won, by the next GE the BN candidates can say, “You see? You voted for Zaid but he couldn’t help with local problems”.

Win or lose, an MP gets no allocation if he is from Pakatan. Zaid would have to carry the burden of managing a large constituency, raise issues in Parliament and whatever leadership tasks he has in PKR/Pakatan Rakyat. If he loses, he can still help the voters and work on building a strong grassroots for the next GE. It’s only 2 years away. If he wins he has to hope the Exco members are available to disburse funds from the ADUN allocations for him. They are very, very busy people. The pressure to perform as MP will be high, whereas even as a non-MP he could work with the Excos for the constituency, as preparation work for next GE. That is why I see a loss as a good thing.

You could argue that if BN wins, Kamalanathan will use use his allocation to reinforce voter support. But win or lose he can do that anyway. Zaid does not get that option. The fact is that you need money to solve people’s problems.

I learned a lot these past 2 weeks and saw a lot of ugliness on both sides; I’ll try to document it soon.

Written by ak57

April 25, 2010 at 8:55 pm

One Israel =/= 1Malaysia

I wrote this email to a friend a week ago and felt it worth sharing, on this accusation of One Israel and 1Malaysia being the same.

I find this issue to be a bit silly, as though it were brought up to distract the public from whatever Zahrain has mentioned. One Israel was a political alliance formed for an election campaign in the early 80s, no different from Barisan Alternatif in 2004. You could also say that at the time One Israel was trying to present a political alternative that was moderate and not extreme.

1Malaysia looks to me like a feel-good public relations (PR) exercise by the ruling government to win over the hearts and minds of the people, by making it appear as a multi-ethnic and not extreme regime.

They are two different things – a political coalition and a PR campaign. The easiest difference being that any politician whether BN/Pakatan/Independent can publicly say they support 1Malaysia. If I was a Pakatan leader I would say I support 1Malaysia and start a bunch of 1Something initiatives in the Pakatan states. This would confuse the rakyat because they can’t psychologically link 1Malaysia to BN if Pakatan supports it. It is an advantage that PR has – it’s not like the tagline for 1Malaysia is ‘BN Sayangkan Semua’ haha!

I know this won’t happen. Sad to say our PKR party grassroots are not educated enough to understand the logic of supporting the enemy platform to defuse it. Much easier to continue to tar and feather BN and hound them non-stop. Our party foundation is built on hating the enemy.

You know what I found funny? One Israel was a combination of left-centrist Social Democrats, Socialists and a religious party.

Doesn’t that sound a lot like Pakatan Rakyat? Haha!

So One Israel = Political Coalition

If Apco is confirmed to have come up with both campaign titles, the issue that PKR wants to highlight is that an Israeli government linked entity is directing Malaysian government public relations with the people.

Ultimately PKR needs to prove that Apco has Israeli government links. By that I mean the company is currently run by members of the Israeli government. Yusmadi Yusoff alleged as much today (http://malaysiakini.com/news/127181)

Having three members of an advisory council that were formerly working for the Israel government is a weak connection. It demonises Jews and places PKR in the same Jew-hating camp as UMNO. It is like saying any board that Tun Daim Zainuddin sits on is under the control of the Malaysian government by virtue of him being an ex-Finance Minister.

The fact is there are far more Americans sitting on the advisory council than Israelis (or maybe even Jews, but you can’t always tell a Jew by the name alone 😉 ). The member list is at http://www.apcoworldwide.com/content/international_advisory_council/members.aspx

One escape route would be to settle for attacking govt over-expenditure on this foreign company. But Anwar has closed the door on that by saying he will prove the Israel connection, which I’m interested to see.

One Alternatives

One Australia was an immigration and ethnic affairs policy that called for an end to multiculturalism. The fear then was that Australia would lose its identity if more Asians kept coming in. I don’t think the fears have gone away.

I could find no evidence of 1Britain or One Britain online. Perhaps it was an anti-immigration movement under a different name. It might be referring to the British National Party which has a strong anti-immigration platform, so one of their old slogans might have been 1Britain. Or Tian Chua/Harakah could have made it up.

I’m suddenly reminded of a saying that, ‘if you can’t attack a man for his ideas, attack the clothes he wears instead’. Talking about 1Australia, 1Israel or 1Britain (which I consider fiction) without linking it with the 1Malaysia campaign seems superficial. 1Malaysia is not a political coalition or anti-immigration political agenda. Is Pakatan so weak that we resort to attacking phrases? What happened to attacking ideas, principles and actions? One Israel was not even referred to as 1Israel until Pakatan chose to spin it!

In Closing

An MP cannot mislead the House so I have no issue with Anwar being referred to the Special Rights & Privileges Committee if the House votes on it. If Anwar does not produce the evidence then the only valid criticism I can see are:

1)            How much is being spent for Apco’s services? Assuming the figure is high, why is the taxpayer money being wasted?

2)            Why a foreign company instead of a local one?

I’ll admit, these criticisms are not as entertaining or dramatic as what they are alluding to now.

Further reading (http://www.aijac.org.au/review/1999/244/oneisrael.html )

Written by ak57

March 28, 2010 at 7:58 pm

The Fuss Over Jantan and Betina

I was surprised to learn that several Pakatan MPs took offense at Nazri’s usage of the phrases ‘anak jantan’ and ‘anak betina’ in Parliament today. Curious to see what the fuss was about I chose to do some investigating.
Just to clarify, for animal breeders the terms mean:

  • Anak jantan; jantan = male
  • Anak betina; betina = female

Malays also use the terms the following way in reference to men:

  • Anak jantan = brave; strong man; champion
  • Anak betina = coward; weak; American equivalent of ‘pussy’

Betina on its own is also used to refer to promiscuous women (slut), and also I believe to unmarried women who are pregnant. The reasoning for that is that those women behaved like animals by having illegitimate sex, so they should be labelled as such. I don’t recall jantan being used in a derogatory fashion.

Colloquialisms are context-sensitive. I understood the chosen interpretation that Nazri was using and guessed who he was referring to on my first reading.

I read the Hansard and from page 72 – 94 (21 minutes excluding Saifuddin’s speech) this was the sequence of events:

1.    After some discussion/argument with the Deputy Speaker, the Pakatan Rakyat MPs obtained permission to respond to the issue of ‘misleading the House’ brought up by Abdul Rahman Dahlan (Kota Belud), which he had done in response to Anwar’s accusing the government of using alleged Israeli agent APCO to promote 1Malaysia. Saifuddin Nasution (Machang) was nominated to speak.
2.    Saifuddin Nasution stated that the Minister, Nazri Aziz (Rantau Panjang) had referred to the obsolete Ordinance 69 in discussing the limits of Kelantan’s border)
3.    Deputy Speaker asked the Minister to explain
4.    Hatta Ramli (Kuala Krai) and Mahfuz Omar (Pokok Sena) made some jibes at Nazri, ‘that he need not answer now, he can take a week if he likes’ and ‘has he read the obsolete laws yet?’
5.    Nazri responded that he need not fear, because he was ‘anak jantan’
6.    Hatta Ramli asked him to prove that he was ‘anak jantan’
7.    Nazri continued that what he had stated previously was not intended to mislead the House and he was ready to be investigated because all that was needed is to refer to the Hansard. Because he was anak jantan he had no fear. The anak betina on the other side however, were scared of being investigated.
8.    Lilah Yasin (Jempol) remarked that anak jantan ‘plays in the front, not in the back’
9.    Lo’Lo’ Mohd Ghazali (Titiwangsa) accused Nazri of being sexist and asked him to retract the word betina
10.    Siti Zailah (Rantau Panjang) stated that the word was an insult to women
11.    Arguments erupted between Sivarasa (Subang), Lo’ Lo’, Bung Moktar (Kinabatangan), Haji Ismail (Maran), Nazri and the Deputy Speaker
12.    Nazri explained that jantan and betina were references to the gender of animals. The ones standing in front of him were humans, so how could there be a question that he was referring to the human women as betina. Therefore they had no reason to get angry.
13.    Saifuddin countered that meant Nazri just stated he was the son of an animal
14.    Lo’Lo’ asked him to retract the word regardless of his reasons
15.    Nazri said he meant no insult to the women
16.    Zuraida Kamaruddin (Ampang) asked him to retract the word
17.    Nazri explained the Malay saying goes that ‘anak jantan’ are brave and ‘anak betina’ are cowards
18.    Deputy Speaker stated that Nazri had no ill intention
19.    The discussion went back on topic, regarding whether Kota Belud had misled the House and whether he had the right to use the Standing Orders to make the speech
20.    Lo’Lo’ quoted Standing Order 36(4) that states a Member of the House may not used words that are improper or rude. She asked the Speaker to make a ruling on the phrase ‘anak betina’ because it is an insult to all women even if it was directed at everyone
21.    Deputy Speaker stated that the Minister had explained the context of the terms used was bravery
22.    Pakatan MPs continued to ask for the word to be retracted. Arguments erupted.
23.    Bung Moktar retorted that it was just a Malay saying (peribahasa)
24.    Mahfuz Omar accused Puteri UMNO of not having brains, because they had not objected to the use of the word
25.    Ibrahim Ali (Pasir Mas) requested to debate the Royal Address
26.    His request was ignored and the argument continued for 10 minutes. Some quotes:
a.    Zuraida argued that any Malay that understood the meaning of the word would not use it in that manner, and questioned whether any Malay uses ‘jantan’ or ‘betina’
b.    Deputy Speaker reiterated multiple times that the words were used in a different context than what the protesting MPs was referring to
c.    Mahfuz Omar questioned whether betina was ever analogous to coward
d.    Lo’Lo’ and Zuraida demanded that the word be retracted and its usage in any context be forbidden in the House. They had no objection to anyone using ‘anak jantan’
e.    Fuziah Salleh (Kuantan) stated that within context ‘anak jantan’ meant brave, but ‘anak betina’ was sexist
f.    Zuraida later stated that any statement that refers to gender whether lelaki, perempuan, jantan or betina was itself sexist. She did not change her position on anak jantan
27.    Deputy Speaker told the MPs not to misinterpret the words as their meaning and context had already been explained. The argument ended with Ibrahim Ali giving his speech while Pakatan MPs asked the ‘cowardly Minister’ to retract.

Imagine that, 21 minutes spent on this issue. Now who was Nazri referring to when he said betina?

It is clear that as Saifuddin’s speech was in response to Kota Belud’s request that Anwar be referred to the Special Rights & Privileges Commitee (the Commitee), then ‘anak betina’ used in this context likely refers to Anwar Ibrahim. Jempol’s immediate follow-up statement that anak jantan plays in the front, follows that interpretation as Anwar has been accused of sodomy (main belakang, playing in the back). I myself thought betina was referring to Anwar.

But Pakatan is critical of the government stand that Anwar be referred to the Committee if he does not prove his allegations on APCO. So Nazri’s statement can be interpreted as being directed at the whole bloc, which includes men and women. So he just referred to women as betina!

If only Nazri had said ‘anak betina dari Permatang Pauh’ then there would be no misinterpretation and less time would have been spent on the issue.

I see it as a colloquialism to be treated with care. Jantan and betina are not curse words and only betina has a negative meaning attached to it. I don’t believe it is commonly used either, searching online I only found it used negatively in the context of coward and not slut.

Given the evidence I feel that Pakatan MPs were trying to stir up trouble. If the word was slut; prostitute; whore; instead of betina, then the slur is clear. Today I didn’t see Nazri as being sexist, just crass. I would say he is ambiguously sexist at most.

Compare that with politicians like Bung Moktar Radin (Kinabatangan) who made the infamous ‘women leak once a month’ remark, or Badruddin Amiruldin (formerly Jerai) who made the ‘boleh nampak terowong tak?’ remark, both in 2007.

Sexism in Parliament is an ongoing problem, and it remains as long as we have boors as elected representatives. I hope that when there is a change in government that a code of ethics is drawn up to prevent sexist and racist remarks from being uttered in Parliament.

Sources
Parliament Hansard 22nd March 2010 (link)
Pakatan to campaign against sexist MPs (link)
Shouting match after motion to refer to Anwar (link)
MP: Anak jantan berani tapi anak betina penakut (link)
Badruddin apologises for ‘terowong’ comment (link)
MPs apologise for sexist remarks in Parliament (link)

Written by ak57

March 24, 2010 at 4:30 am

Anwar’s Trial, Day 2 Briefing

Jonson Chong, Mustaffa Kamil, Razlan, Amiruddin Shaari

I dropped by HQ tonight for the first nightly briefing on the trial proceedings. Attendees were mostly reporters and local PKR grassroots.

Jonson Chong, PKR Director of Communications started the briefing by stating that:

  • Karpal Singh requested the judge to cite Utusan Malaysia for contempt of court due to the headline it ran today.
  • The judge ruled that there were no grounds for contempt of court, the defence can make a police report (which they did)
  • What was stated in the article implies that multiple acts of sodomy occurred, but the charges are only for one

Razlan (I believe he’s assisting Anwar’s legal team) then continued:

  • Today’s proceedings were held in camera at Karpal Singh’s request, so lawyers are not allowed to discuss what transpired
  • There was concern that the contents of the testimony would be damaging to the court proceedings if made public
  • There was a site visit to Unit 11-5-1 at the Desa Damansara Condominium by the judge and legal teams
  • There may be another site visit tomorrow to the Sekysen 16 office

Mustaffa Kamil Ayub (PKR Vice President)

  • We will continue to hold ceramah nationwide to educate people on current issues and the conspiracy that is going on in Anwar’s trial

Reporter Questions

Q: Why call Najib and Rosmah to testify?
Razlan: We know that Saiful met Najib prior to the alleged sodomy, so we want them to testify for the record.

Q: Can we have the court proceedings telecast live online?
Razlan: You can request, but normally that is not done.

Q: What about Saiful’s implication that sodomy occurred multiple times, and was the Can I F U remark made the first time or another time?
Razlan: That is outside the scope of the court proceedings, what I can say is the charges are for one incident.

Q: Do you have any comment on the turmoil in the Pakatan states primarily in Penang?
Mustaffa: We are not a party of angels, but it is clear that acts of destabilisation are going on. Small differences of opinion are being magnified and issues blown up out of proportion.

Q: What if Anwar is found guilty?
Mustaffa: I am confident that Pakatan Rakyat will go on.

Q: I’m sorry for this sensitive question, but why does Anwar use a condominium for his meetings when he has a house and office to use? This applies both now and in 1999 when he used Tivoli Villa.
Mustaffa: It is difficult for me to comment, but I can say that Anwar is a humble man and does not mind going to his friend’s house for a meeting. He does not stand on ceremony, you don’t have to go up to see him but rather he will come down to see you.

*Update* Date for Court of Appeal hearing has been fixed for February 12th.

Written by ak57

February 5, 2010 at 7:43 am

Arsonists Blacken the Name of Islam

I was shocked to wake up yesterday and read the news about the church bombings. Though I think the media could have used a better word – arson seems more appropriate because when people see ‘bomb’ they start thinking C4 and dynamite. It makes me sad to think that in all likelihood Muslims performed this crime. I cannot think of a group more motivated to do it other than the group that want Allah to be exclusive to Muslims in our country. That’s a large group with many suspects.

Reactions were swift and there were so many, I’ll only list some:

  1. Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak issued a statement condemning the attacks (link)
  2. Selangor Chief Minister Khalid Ibrahim visited one of the churches attacked, condemned the attacks and called for calm (link)
  3. BN Youth Chief Khairy Jamaluddin also visited a church, condemned the attacks and urged for caution by the public in making statements or taking action following these incidents (link)
  4. The King urged people to remain calm (link)
  5. Cabinet Minister Bernard Dompok stated that actions by irresponsible parties had clouded relations between the races in the country, and called for reflection and prayer (link)
  6. Home Minister Hishamuddin Hussein and Information Minister Rais Yatim condemned the attacks (link1 and link2)
  7. The government warned that ISA will be used if necessary (link)
  8. Pakatan Rakyat condemned the church attacks (link)
  9. PKR President Wan Azizah issued a statement calling for tolerance and peace (link)
  10. DAPSY and Selangor DAP issued statements condemning the attacks (link1 and link2)
  11. PAS issued a statement condemning the attack (link)
  12. Pakatan Rakyat asked UMNO to take responsibility for the attacks (link)
  13. 121 NGO groups released a joint statement condemning the attacks (link)
  14. Inspector-General of Police Musa Hassan gave frequent updates on the investigation, too many links so I’ll only list one (link)
  15. PM Najib allocates RM500,000 to Metro Tabernacle Church to be rebuilt elsewhere (link)

For the record, the four churches attacked by arsonists were:

  1. Metro Tabernacle Church in Desa Melawati, KL
  2. Assumption Church in Jalan Templer, PJ
  3. Life Chapel in Section 17, PJ
  4. Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in PJ

After reading the reports I can’t help but feel that these attacks were coordinated. The hacking of the Judiciary and Herald websites; the use of motorcycle helmets as bombs; the close timing of the attacks – all of these indicate an organised group at work to intimidate our people and keep our country divided.

What message do these attacks send to non-Muslims in this country? The SMS messages being forwarded around sounded extreme – if you wear a cross you will be beaten; if your car has a church sticker it will be smashed; a church in Kg.Subang torched; cars in Bangsar KL smashed. All lies yet people still forwarded it around.

Islam is a religion of peace and tolerance yet too often we see Muslims practicing bigotry, inciting hatred and curtailing personal freedom. Small wonder then that people are so gullible and paranoid.

It makes my heart weep to know these criminals have created fear of Islam and reinforced fear of Islam in this country. I am glad that leaders from both sides have condemned the attacks and the PM gave the allocation (despite losses of est. RM1+ million by that church).

Hopefully everyone will remain calm and there is no escalation to the conflict. I sincerely hope that Christians understand these acts do not reflect the feelings of most Muslims in this country.

I made the poster above, feel free to forward it around.

Written by ak57

January 10, 2010 at 5:15 am

Augustine Paul’s Passing

I was surprised to learn of Judge Augustine Paul’s death this morning. I didn’t think much of it and felt nothing. It isn’t like I knew the man after all. I only knew him as the judge who sentenced Anwar to prison, and his involvement in other high profile cases was unknown to me.

I don’t get it. After he sentenced Anwar he walked freely around the neighbourhood, all alone, and nobody assaulted him (in retaliation for his judgment). In my naiveté I thought the nation saw him as a pawn, a small fish, not worth taking revenge on.

Yet now that he is dead I see all these postings online expressing joy, thanking God and so on for his death.

It was worse when I saw activists I knew expressing the same feelings. There is a dark vengeful side to them that I wasn’t aware of.

He was not the evil dictator of a downtrodden country. He was not a mass murderer. He was not a terrorist mastermind. Truly, are there not better villains out there to hate? Why take joy in someone’s death?

Having read these postings I feel sad now for his family, knowing that their father’s name is being cursed now and possibly for years to come. I feel sad to see the lack of humanity among Malaysians online, and among the ranks of Malaysian activists fighting for justice and peace.

You know what would have made me happy? If he had made a death-bed confession admitting to the corruption charges that people assume he is guilty of. If he done that and named the person(s) involved in said corrupt judgments. Who knows, if PR had taken over the Federal Government he might have worked out a plea bargain to deliver the bigger crooks to justice? It’s not like he can come forward now when the crooks are free to make his family disappear.

He’s dead now so we’ll never know what might have been.

 As it stands now his death served no good. It has given grief to his family and friends and short-lived joy to his accusers.

Does his passing on mean that the Judiciary is no longer corrupt? Does it undo any damage he has done to victims of his judgments?

No, it does not.

I’m sure some of the people dancing with joy now will realise that the next time the courts make a ruling that is deemed unfair. I hope they realise then that ultimately, revenge is not rewarding.

To think I’m friends with some of these people. Ugh.

References

The Star: Judge Augustine Paul dies at 66 (link)

The Star: Judge Augustine Paul laid to rest (link)

Malaysiakini: Federal Court judge Augustine Paul dies (link)

Written by ak57

January 3, 2010 at 10:15 pm

Making sense of crossovers, Part 5: Parting thoughts


As hard to believe as this sounds, I am both for and against the crossover efforts. In fact the only thing that would make me happy would be mass by-elections or fresh general elections. On September 11th, PKR Vice President Sivarasa Rasiah stated that the Opposition would hold general elections 6-12 months after seizing control of the government, so there is hope that the voters will get a say in who runs their government.

The main reasons the Opposition made any headway at all in the five states was the dissemination of information. The mainstream media has its mouth gagged on many issues, so the Internet and sms was used to great effect to spread the word.

However for states such as Terengganu, Sabah, Sarawak and Pahang where the Internet user base and income level is much lower, spreading information is difficult. It takes time to change people’s minds in these states. By-elections would not result in a big swing towards the Opposition.

The only feasible way for the Opposition to take control of the government is via crossovers. I strongly hope that laws are amended so that the Federal government does not have the kind of control it has now over the State governments. Until those amendments are made our democracy will never mature into a two-party system. A mixed cabinet of BN and Opposition MPs would help too.

The BN government has made full use of their Federal control to make life difficult for the Opposition state governments. Let us hope that the Opposition does not do the same once it takes over.

Since I completed this article we have witnessed the use of the Internal Security Act on Raja Petra, Teresa Kok and Tan Hoon Cheng. This scare tactic which appears to be initiated independently by the police begs the question of who is pulling their strings. It is legal for them to use ISA to detain people for questioning, but there are many other laws they could use instead of ISA. Someone must have encouraged them to do so.

The ISA is so strongly linked in the minds of the people as ‘government intimidation’ that I seriously doubt the PM or his Cabinet members were responsible in the case of Teresa Kok and Tan Hoon Cheng. Those arrests made no sense whatsoever. Raja Petra is a special case because people within BN and PKR view him as too outspoken. While what he has said about Islam makes sense to people like me, it upsets many more. I am curious how much attention Raja Petra’s detention will receive in the form of candlelight vigils, forums and so on now that the other two have been released.

Anwar Ibrahim did not meet his September 16th deadline, citing unrest caused by the ISA. He has tried to arrange a private meeting with the Prime Minister to discuss a handover of government, which the PM rightfully denied. I saw a copy of the letter sent – it was vaguely written and mentioned no list of crossovers. The PM must show strength and not give in to unsubstantiated facts (factoid).

On September 17th SAPP pulled out of BN, yet chose to remain independent. It appears they too wish to see if Anwar has the numbers.

Anwar then asked for an emergency session of Parliament for September 23rd, which I assume won’t happen either. He even stated he would see the Agong to seek intervention.

I am patient enough to wait a few weeks until October 13th when Parliament reconvenes. In my view Anwar fixed a deadline and didn’t finish his preparation work. Private meetings with the PM would be part of this work.

BN MPs finding it difficult to reach the Peninsular is not relevant, because they can submit their resignations in writing. Their lives and their families’ lives were always at risk, the usage of the ISA did not change that. Has some form of protection been given to them, or will they be left to fend for themselves like the private investigator Bala after giving his statutory declaration on Najib?

Anwar said he would take over the government on the 16th and he failed, plain and simple. When meeting the Agong was mentioned I knew that it was an act of desperation to save face. I do not doubt that he will take over the government eventually – I just wish he would be more patient.

To date, there is still no evidence of the 31 BN MPs ready to join the Opposition.


Making sense of crossovers

This series of articles tries to analyse the unending efforts of the Federal Opposition to take over the government by getting BN MPs to join them. Their goal is to get at least 31 BN MPs to change their allegiance on September 16th.

Part 1 looks at how PKR grew and the state it is in now, as they are the prime mover of the crossover ‘operation’.

Part 2 discusses the many justifications heard to support the crossovers.

Part 3 discusses the moral and democratic issues and suggested alternatives.

Part 4 describes ways to prevent and encourage crossovers.

Part 5 offers some parting thoughts and views on recent events

Written by ak57

September 24, 2008 at 7:00 am